Alamo Colleges Students Talk to District Senators as Part of State Community College Day - Community College News Now
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Alamo Colleges Students Talk to District Senators as Part of State Community College Day



by Monica Levitan

As part of Community College Day, students from the Alamo Colleges had the opportunity to talk to their district senators at the Capital in Austin.

A majority of the 24 San Antonio College students who attended the event wanted to get a better understanding of how the Texas Legislature works, according to The Ranger.

Sophomore Elexus Liggins used this event as an opportunity to ask Sen. Jose Menendez, District 26, how various social media platforms affect community engagement.

Menendez responded stating that he found Twitter is the fastest way for his team to post information, but different social media platforms are being utilized by a wide range of voters, so it is important to post content on all social media.

“I noticed that my older voters are on Facebook, and my younger voters are using Snapchat,” Menendez said, adding that though he doesn’t post on any of the platforms himself, nothing is posted on any platforms without his approval.

Student Government Association president Mario Lopez attended Community College Day to get a foundation for the association to become more professional. Lopez planned to ask state legislators for guidance on how to a campus senate with a student representative from each department.

Through the creation of a campus senate, Lopez hopes it will encourage more students to actively engage in making campus changes.

The SGA also plans to change where the organization hold its meetings from the Craft Room to the Fiesta Room in Loftin Student Center.

Navarro College sophomore Chasidah Fried attended the event to ask legislators for ethics to be a required core course in all Texas community colleges.

Fried said that the basis of ethics is choosing good over evil, and that if ethics is taught in a normative way, the state will save money because students will make better decisions regarding staying in school and engaging in criminal activity.

“Evil is a permeable barrier. Ethics gives students the tools to go through it,” Fried said.