Columbus State Community College Use Social Media to End Stigma Against Community Colleges - Community College News Now
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Columbus State Community College Use Social Media to End Stigma Against Community Colleges



by Monica Levitan

Several students at Columbus State Community College are taking to social media to end the negative stigma against community colleges.

Kenan Dunn is a senior information technology major at Columbus State, one of the 23 community colleges in Ohio.

“It’s been fantastic” Dunn told ABC6 as he reflects on his time at Columbus State. “Every professor I’ve had has been deep into their field.”

With his two-year degree that he will receive at the end of the semester, Dunn believes he will easily be able to get a job after he graduates. With that education under his belt, Dunn doesn’t understand why more people don’t choose to enroll at a community college.

“People think community colleges, they think lesser education and I don’t think that’s the case at all,” said Dunn.

Steve Robinson, president of Owens Community College agreed with Dunn’s perception, and wants that stigma to change. So he began a social media campaign called #EndCCStigma.

It has even gained support from other colleges.

“Anything we can do to raise the awareness of community colleges and the importance of the work we do in our communities is absolutely fabulous,” said Dr. Rebecca Butler, executive vice president at Columbus State.

Community colleges are more affordable and provide additional wrap-around services such as courses that can be transferred to a four-year college after graduation, Butler said.

At Columbus State, she said, you can earn a two-year degree that helps you accomplish your dreams at a faster rate. One of the best examples, Butler added, is the college’s “Computer Science, I-T and Design” programs.

“We have a really strong career technical component, so people who graduate here go directly into the workforce,” Butler said.

“Honestly I think specifically about cybersecurity some of the best candidates come out of a community college because they get more hands-on education versus a four-year college,” said Mike Greer, an instructor at the college who teaches courses on cybersecurity.